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Homilies for 33rd sunday year b

You can tell by the words of the Gospel and all the readings, you can tell that the end is near. The apocalypse is the revelation. You will all be happy to know that this is not to be taken too seriously. And the same with this kind of language. When is it coming? What day? What hour? Who is going to bring it? All these things. It takes, for instance, the crucifixion of Jesus.
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Clearly the gospel writers are pointing to that great day when Jesus will return, bring this world to an end, and establish the Kingdom of God.
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Here we are at the end of this Church Year once again. Next Sunday is Christ the King and then we enter into Advent. Today the readings direct our attention to the end of time. We are promised that if we are faithful, we shall not be destroyed. We are promised that the Archangel Michael will be there helping us. We are told that the one great sacrifice for sins has been made and we must cling to the Lord. God will gather His elect and we must be ready. Many people live in fear of the end of the world, the end of time, the great gathering of people by the Lord God. It is awesome to think that one day we shall all be gathered to the Lord with all who have gone before us and those who many come after us. The fear comes because there is always the possibility that I will not be counted among those who are chosen.
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Next homily:

The Last Days of Hope. Since the age of 10, I have been in boarding schools. One of the exciting times in such schools is towards the end of term when there would be an opportunity to return home. There would be that mathematical genius whose task every morning would be to announce the countdown to the great day of going home: the days, the hours, the minutes, and the seconds. And finally that great day would arrive. We excitedly went home. We enjoyed our holidays — especially during Christmas. And then sadly, the holidays would end. I remember, learning one of the powerful lessons of my life from this experience — that everything comes to an end. School days came to an end, so did the holidays!

You can tell by the words of the Gospel and all the readings, you can tell that the end is near. The apocalypse is the revelation. You will all be happy to know that this is not to be taken too seriously. And the same with this kind of language. When is it coming? What day? What hour? Who is going to bring it? All these things. It takes, for instance, the crucifixion of Jesus. It takes, for instance, the Romans coming in and destroying the temple. It takes, for instance, all of these things. Because this is an apocalypse.

As it happened, as it happened. But Jesus is not talking about that. Because Jesus is with us. Jesus is with us from the moment he was born at Christmas. For all eternity, he walks with us, he talks with us, he has become part of our lives. He is close to us and he promises that nothing will happen that he himself will not cover with his love and with his presence.

Elie Wiesel might be unfamiliar to you, but he is very familiar to my generation because he was a little boy who went with his father and mother and sister into Auschwitz, and only one person came out and that was him. And he came out and he wrote about the terrible, terrible holocaust. Now, when we talk about this sort of speaking, the apocalyptic language, it is a holocaust.

It is a destruction of all that went before and that is…. There were eight men and they were all Jews, or perhaps there were a couple of other people, that had done something wrong and they were put on trial… There was no trial, they just made seven scaffolds, seven places to hang these poor gentleman.

And then what they did was they announced that these men were enemies of the people or what have you. And the little boy was quite frightened and the men were trying to be strong. So they put the nooses around their necks and they pulled the cord and they fell through the thing.

The only trouble was the men died instantly, they broke their necks, but the little boy was swinging because he was so light. And then, finally, finally, after a lengthy period, the poor little swinging boy died. While he was swinging, a voice came before the man who was telling this story and a voice came from the back. This is not a holocaust that Jesus would accept. This is not a holocaust that God wants to see happen.

But it is allowed for some strange reason that we might learn something. These people helped each other, they shared their food with each other, they cared for each other, they actually loved each other. These poor prisoners in this horrible place, month after month, they held people in their arms when they died, they walked people to the places where they were frying these people and burning them.

And all is lost because Jesus is tried and found guilty and then he is brought to be hung on a cross and dies. For now there was not just death and vicious men having their way.

It was an apocalypse full of anger and pain and fear, and, in the end, full of glory. If you look around you, what has come out of all of that terror, the tears of the people and everything else, what has come out of that? We know how God loves us. We know how God cares for us. We know how God is with us. We know that this is what triumphed down through the centuries, hundreds of years following hundreds of years, and will continue to the end.

We are sent here not to worry, not to worry about armies, not to worry about inaudible , not to be worried about being condemned to death. We hear today how terrible that was and how courageous the Lord was. And it is courage that goes on. It is Jesus on the cross. He dies on the cross, but he rises again. And the word to all of us is we are to work and to heal and to love and to care, and pay no attention to anything but how to love properly, carefully and well. All Rights Reserved. If you would like to use our transcript of this sermon updated , please contact us for permission.

It is sometimes hard to accurately transcribe Father Hanly's reflections, so please let us know if you think we have made a mistake in any of our transcripts, and let us have your suggestions. We believe these homilies are inspiring for everyone, not only for Roman Catholics or other Christians. Join OUR email list. By clicking submit, you agree to share your email address with the site owner and Mailchimp to receive emails from the site owner. Use the unsubscribe link in those emails to opt out at any time. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam.

Learn how your comment data is processed. Skip to content. The end of what? The end of the world, probably. This is called apocalyptic language. And all of this belongs to a certain kind of a style of writing which we all use. It is another way, though, of looking at it and this is the important way. Jesus is not trying to scare you. It is a destruction of all that went before and that is… Now, this story, one of the stories he brought out was this. And there was one little boy. And the little boy was standing there with the gentlemen. Where is God?

He never found out who it was behind him. Very touching. More than touching, a lesson to be learned. And what is the lesson to be learned? And then this is what Jesus says. Who is this who comes? The Son of Man is the Messiah. And who is the Messiah in this story? The Messiah is Jesus and he is there. And he is there and then what happens? And what happened?

He rose from the dead. The whole world changed forever. And why is this? Because the Messiah lives and he lives in us and we live because of him. If we are not here to worry, then what are we here for? We are here to serve, because the Lord serves. He serves us. And that is what we are here for. Oh, terrible, terrible this. Jesus won for all eternity a place for each and every one of us. Come follow me. Join OUR email list By clicking submit, you agree to share your email address with the site owner and Mailchimp to receive emails from the site owner.

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